Menu

Dentistry Personal Statement Application DDS International, Indian Dentist in USA, Pharmacist

After finishing Dental School in my native India, I immigrated to the United States in 2013 and now hope to resume my education and subsequently my career in dentistry here in America. My central lon- term goal is to practice in India as well as the US, with my efforts here in America helping to fund and support my efforts in India.

In early 2016, I became a full-time Dental Assistant at Happy Smiles Family Dental in Schaumburg, IL. Working here has me especially highly motivated to enter a DDS program, dealing every day with patients and other dental professionals, always discussing current advancements in dentistry. Working alongside Dr. XXXX has helped me to develop an extensive knowledge base concerning standards and the management of a dental private practice in America.

I stay busy. In addition to my full time position as a Dental Assistant, I work at Walgreens on weekends as a Certified Pharmacy Technician. Every Monday, starting this month, I have been given time off to volunteer at the Craniofacial Department at the University of XXXX, Chicago where I get to observe cancer survival, different syndrome p, Cleft lip and Cleft palate pt's and how the teams work together to manage the treatments; people with severe skeletal Class 3 pt. for example, with orthodontists and oral surgeons working side by side. 

Being accepted to and completing your distinguished DDS program will enable me to acquire the skills, knowledge, and experience that I need to succeed in dentistry here in America. During the past year, I have continued to master the all important art of patient/dentist communication by making a special effort to listen to the patient attentively concerning their needs, fears and goals. Helping to treat misaligned teeth, adjusting brackets, utilizing habit-breaking appliances and attending dental conferences, all have provided me with a wealth of knowledge and practical experience that will enable me to hit the ground running in a DDS program.

As soon as I arrived in the USA I began studying for the NBDE test and became a Registered Pharmacy Technician employed by CVS Pharmacy in XXXX. I am especially grateful for the experience because I learned many things that are also useful for or related to dentistry: insurance in particular. I also soon became active as a volunteer, helping with donation drives for the American Dental Association and the World Cancer Organization, supported by CVS.

In 2014, I moved to Chicago where I shadowed a Dentist for almost a full year, observing everything intensely and helping out with many procedures as well. I learned a great deal about how dentistry is practiced in America. While studying for Part 2 of the NBDE, I became a Certified Pharmacy Technician and joined Walgreens Pharmacy in 2015. I think what I have enjoyed the most is reminding people, especially the elderly, about their vaccinations and compliance medication and helping them with insurance paperwork. I continue to work as a volunteer asking for donations for noble causes sponsored by Walgreens, such as the American Heart Association and Children with Disabilities. 

In the 9th grade, during my winter vacation, I had an accident while playing cricket, tripping badly and fracturing a tooth. The pain and agony I experienced was ruthless. My parents rushed me to a dentist in the city where for the first time I met Dr. XXXX. I was so fascinated by the experience that after I got well I asked him if I could shadow him during my next winter vacation and he agreed. That experience cemented the goal of dentistry in my mind for good. Everything that I would do after that has been geared towards dentistry and that is still the case. Single, no children, I give everything to dentistry 24/7.

Before coming to the USA, I worked for nine months at a private dental clinic in India that provided me with exposure and experience to a diverse patient community.  Not long after my arrival, I shadowed two dentists in private practice in Illinois, which taught me how dental professionals work in this country and provided an excellent foundation for advanced clinical work. 

Probably the most important experience of my professional life so far, however, that which has most affected my vision, heart and soul, was my extensive participation in rural dental camps while I was a dental student in India. Nothing has been as fulfilling as helping whole populations of people who rarely if ever receive treatment, providing free dental checkups while educating the community about the methods and significance of proper oral hygiene. We attended to hundreds of patients suffering from severe malocclusion and poor periodontal health. It was here that I learned the special importance of building patient trust by actively listening, counseling and providing pro-active education.

I thank you for considering my application to your distinguished DDS Program.

Sample 1st Paragraph for Indian International Dentist IDP Program Application

Personal Statement of Purpose for Advanced Standing Admission to Study towards the DDS Degree. XXXX Gandhi

An Indian woman and a dentist, still only 25, I am now making America my new permanent home and I write on behalf of my application to study towards the DDS Degree in your distinguished institution. At the forefront of my identity stands my last name, perhaps the most famous in all India, ‘Gandhi’. I take a great deal of pride in the way in which our leader, spiritual and political, Mahatma Gandhi is known all over the world, as a brave man who challenged great powers on behalf of the poor. Gandhi’s preferential focus on the poor helped to inspire my own cause, to help those with desperate oral health needs, and no money to pay for that assistance. XXXX Gandhi believes strongly that basic oral health care should be seen as a human right in India as it already is in many other places. In this way, I honor my distant relative and spiritual leader Mahatma, who helped bring suffrage and enfranchisement to the poor, so that, among other things, they might someday be able to afford oral health care for themselves and their children.

Indian Applicants and Admission to Dental School as Foreign Dentists

Few people know exactly how the selection process works for international dentist programs because it is not public information. At least, all information having to do with ethnic quotas is kept strictly confidential by the school because it is legally sensitive information, they could be sued. I enjoy trying to figure it out, trying to guess, and I think a lot of it is just very logical. Let me tell you several things that I do know for sure.

 Diversity is important. The admissions committee wants people from all over the world to attend an international dentists program, with each corner of the planet represented. And, it just seems to make sense to me that they are not going to like the idea of any one group being greatly overrepresented. About 17% of the world’s population is Indian, and for this reason I doubt very much if the percentage of Indian students in any given dentistry program ever exceeds that percentage.

 Now, I can tell you just from my own experience that Indians are way overrepresented in the ranks of applicants to International Dentist Programs. I know this because while they are only 17% of the world’s population, at least half of the people who turn to me for help with a statement to an International Dentist program are Indian. This leads me to the conclusion that you are probably going to face the stiffest competition from other Indians.

 There is no shortage of dentists in America. America is not in need of large numbers of Indian dentists to practice here; and the primary focus of the admissions committees is selecting applicants who are going to help the underserved. And where are the underserved? You need to make this part clear. I think you want to make a convincing argument and have creative ideas about helping the underserved both here in America as well as back in India.

 It is for this reason that I feel strongly that we need to focus on your long term plans for the underserved. Most people are weak on this point, saying only general and vague things like I want to help people in developing countries. If you want them to accept you, I think it would be a very good idea for you to have more specific and concrete, creative ideas for the long term, and in this way show greater maturity and dedication than your competitors.

Dental Elective Program in India with Volunteering

Example of Personal Statement for DDS International, Indian Dentist Applicant, Canada

I qualified as a dentist in India in 2005 at the prestigious Saraswati Dental College which is ranked 10th in India. I practiced and taught in India for 3 years, including a one year internship. In 2008, my husband took up employment in the Canada. My hopes to qualify to practice there were deferred because of a temporary suspension of the International Dentistry program in Canada and uncertainty as to the timing of its reinstatement. This situation, along with the program costs and the need to contribute to family finances, caused me to retrain as a counsellor and to work in that field for the last several years. I always intended to return to my ‘first love’, dentistry, and now finally find myself in a position to do so. I now seek to acquire the skills and knowledge to enable me to practice in the US.

I hope to gain initial experience in the US in a hospital setting and then to gain exposure to the work of a private clinic. Ultimately, I want to combine practice and teaching. I was selected to provide teaching to dental students in India in various subjects including the specialties of oral and maxillofacial surgery. I loved teaching and managed to significantly increase attendance at my classes. I believe that this is both an indication of my technical skills and knowledge, and my ability to communicate effectively. Oral and maxillofacial surgery is a particular interest of mine because of the continuing and exciting advances in techniques and materials in this specialty. It is my hope to assist in future progress in this field.

I wanted to pursue a profession in which I would be providing genuine help to others. If I had ever had any doubts that dentistry provided such opportunities, they would have disappeared after one session in a ‘dental camp’ in rural India. Seeing grateful smiles and severe pain relieved almost instantaneously certainly provided the kind of satisfaction that I had anticipated when I decided on my career path. It is certainly my intention to apply some of my time to providing free treatments to those who cannot afford it throughout my career.

Although I have not practiced dentistry for some time, I have kept abreast of developments by the reading of professional journals and on-line research, for instance, studying the output of the National Dental Practice Based Research Network. Consequently I found no difficulty in passing the NBDE Part 1 examination at my first attempt. I am confident that I shall quickly ‘find my feet’ in the program and will, as I always do, seek to excel rather than to merely succeed.

My choice of counselling as a temporary career substitute was no coincidence. While practicing and teaching dentistry, I became fascinated by the psychological aspects of the profession. Because I have lived in several countries, Muscat, Canada and India, I am aware of the cultural differences in attitudes to oral hygiene and their effects. This awareness prompted an interest in effective preventative education. It is clearly the case that merely providing information about the necessity for an effective and regular oral hygiene regime does not necessarily have the desired results and that education needs to be carefully tailored to the patient or patient population under consideration, and results carefully monitored and approaches/media adjusted as necessary. For instance, trying to persuade a lazy teenager of the health advantages of careful and regular brushing might often fail, whereas pointing out the negative social and romantic effects of bad breath usually has the desired effect. I am also very interested in identifying the most effective techniques to overcome the fears of anxious and very young patients.  I hope to be able to ‘add value’ to the program by sharing some insights into the important psychological aspects of preventative education and patient reassurance.  

It would not have been possible to succeed as a Counsellor without certain characteristics that are also important in the practice of dentistry. I am empathetic, I am able to quickly gain the trust and confidence of patients and to communicate effectively with them, I look beyond superficial symptoms to basic causes and have highly developed observational and diagnostic skills.

I have studied, worked and socialized with people from many ethnic and social backgrounds and am widely travelled. I am fluent in English and Hindi. I enjoy sharing knowledge of my own culture and learning about others. I get on easily with others and I enjoy being part of a team but am also happy to lead when given the opportunity to do so.

I can assure the reader that, if selected, I shall apply exceptional diligence and commitment to the program for my own benefit and that of my fellow students.

Thank you for considering my application.

Foreign Trained Indian Applicants to Dental School

With respect to my clients who are already dentists, applying for advanced standing positions, nearly half of them have been Indian. This has resulted in a rapidly increasing and extensive awareness on my part of the great challenges facing India in the future with respect to meeting the oral health needs of the equally rapidly expanding Indian population. In fact, I have often reflected upon the fact that India is projected to overtake China as the world’s most populous nation within only a few decades. India also has the some of the highest rates of oral cancer in the world.

Dentistry is just as global as medicine, if not more so. Many if not most dental schools now have their own outreach programs to the Developing World, places like India. Thus, I feel strongly that it is imperative for Indian applicants to express some desire in their personal statement for helping the underserved in their country of origin, especially as a long term goal. New, flexible, and creative strategies are needed that, regardless of the times, can be used on an ongoing basis in a sustainable way, to ensure that the nation will maintain a dental care workforce with the skills and cultural competence to provide the care that the nation’s people deserve.

Rebecca, Ailey, and Sarah talk about their amazing experience as interns in the Palampur Dentistry Internship program. Discover the details straight from the volunteers as they discuss all the important logistics of the program from where you will live, w

India is the second most populous country in the world with an extensive rural population (68.8%) and according to projections, India will overtake China within the next several decades as the most populous nation in the world because China controls its population growth and India does not.

In India, Children less than 18 years constitute about 40% of the population. Approximately, 23.5% of the urban population resides in urban slums. The extensive rural population, school children and the urban slum dwellers are denied of even the basic dental services though there is continuous advancement in the field of dentistry. The dentist to population ratio has dramatically improved in the last one to two decades with no significant improvement in the oral health status of the general population. The various studies have revealed an increasing trend in oral diseases in the recent times especially among this underserved population. Alternate strategies have to be thought about rather than the traditional oral health-care delivery through private dentists on fee for service basis. Mobile and portable dental services are a viable option to take the sophisticated oral health services to the doorsteps of the underserved population. The databases were searched for publications from 1900 to the present (2013) using terms such as Mobile dental services, Portable dental services and Mobile and portable dental services with key articles obtained primarily from MEDLINE. This paper reviews the published and unpublished literature from different sources on the various mobile dental service programs successfully implemented in some developed and developing countries. Though the mobile and portable systems have some practical difficulties like financial considerations, they still seem to be the only way to reach every section of the community in the absence of national oral health policy and organized school dental health programs in India. The material for the present review was obtained mainly by searching the biomedical databases for primary research material using the search engine with key words such as mobile and/or portable dental services in developed and developing countries (adding each of these terms in a sequential order). Based on the review of the programs successfully implemented in developed countries, we propose a model to cater to the basic oral health needs of an extensive underserved population in India that may be pilot tested. The increasing dental manpower can best be utilized for the promotion of oral health through mobile and portable dental services. The professional dental organizations should have a strong motive to translate this into reality.