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DDS Degree, BSMS Research, Korean-American

April 12, 2016

 


I have always been fascinated by the dreams of one day becoming a dentist. The aspect of being able to take on the responsibility and dedicate my time in helping others brings me great happiness even by imagination. The immense gratification coming from tangible results of dental-treatment, where they have recovered both functionality and aesthetic appearance, will help the patients with self-esteem and confidence which is what makes becoming a dentist such an appealing occupation. Most importantly, perhaps, I believe that I can make important contributions to on-going research in the field of dentistry by utilizing my Biological Science Master’s (BSMS) degree and my many years of experience working with animal models. I appreciate the everyday tasks performed by the dentist and this drives me to apply for dental school.

The weakest part of my application is probably my age; 31 years old seems like getting a late start at dental school judging from the average age of those who are admitted. However, in the past few years, I have met many good people, have had the opportunity to work at one of the best research facilities in the world, and also experienced the life of a soldier by serving in the military for two-and-a-half years. I treasure these experiences and because of it, I feel strong that I have the potential to succeed in dental school and make a positive impact on the field of dentistry.

One of the strongest parts of my application is that I hold a BSMS from XXXX University for research in understanding the relationship between different mRNA-transcripts during neural regenerative process after injury to the peripheral neurons. Upon completion of the BSMS Degree, I joined a research group at XXXX and I am currently employed here in examining the potential use of low-intensity focused ultrasound as a neuromodulation capable therapeutic agent using rodent, sheep and human models. With each professional step that I have taken, however, I have realized with increasing clarity that my heart lies in dentistry and I am most attracted to the lifestyle of the dentist, building lasting interpersonal relationships and providing helpful services for the alleviation of pain and discomfort.

I am very excited about the prospect of working side-by-side with research investigators in dentistry, potentially on dental stem cells. Dental stem cells are observed to be one of the most powerful stem cells, which replicate at a faster rate and for longer periods of time than stem cells from any other tissue. The prospect of creating novel stem cell treatment that decreases the prescription of powerful drugs and mechanical tools that could weaken the immune system; will pose a great excitement to dental community. I look forward to potential involvement with the dental research community as well as my duty to help patients as a dentist. I am eager to face many challenges that surround dentistry in hopes of creating more reliable and affordable dental services, but especially focused on geriatric population that are financially burdened or immunologically weakened to undergo difficult oral procedures. The advent of noninvasive therapeutic intervention to replace or repair teeth in dental patients will reduce the uncomfortable imagery associated with dental office. Additionally, as an immigrant from Korea, I would like to dedicate some of my time in getting involved with humanitarian dental missions that offer services to provide overall health to patients in Asian countries where medical reach is still limited.

Apart from standard dental curriculum, I believe that there is much that we can achieve in the decades that lie ahead. In this sense, I want to develop additional expertise and gain experience in a variety of areas, such as maxillofacial surgery or orthodontics.  Most importantly, I feel strongly that I have the kind of gift for manual dexterity, "hand-skill" in Korean, that makes for a great oral surgeon.  I was involved with the implantation of electroencephalography electrode wires (approximately length of 0.9milimeter) to the cranial surface of the mouse skull and performed surgery on extraction of small (1.5-2milimeter) peripheral dorsal ganglion neurons from rodents. I have been commended on multiple occasions while performing these tedious tasks, which further gave me the confidence and belief that I possess such a skill that people commonly call as good “hand-skill”.

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