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DDS Application in Canada, Indian

March 23, 2014


As I write this, thousands of miles from my childhood home of Mumbai, I reflect on the events that placed my feet irrevocably on the path of Dentistry, a path laid with an understanding of what it truly means to be poor, stigmatized and ostracized simply because of where you went to school. Whether or not I must forget everything I saw in the slums of Mumbai is immaterial; I know that I never will. I swore that if I had the chance, I would give back in any way I could. Coming to Canada with my family when I was 12, with a pocketful of hopes, I knew I finally had my chance.

Earning my DDS is more than a logical progression, it is a natural choice given my sensibilities and all that I have experienced. As a Biology student, cancer was a fascinating subject, presenting a wide array of challenges to scientists and hardship to countless people. The field of Dentistry will enable me to conduct research into oral cancers, a passion for answers that stems from particularly personal experiences, namely my grandmother and aunt’s battles with cancer.

Upon building my exposure in the field, post-graduation, I aim to start my own practice along with an associate dentist who can run things while I use my success as a jumping off point for dedicating myself to pro bono dental care for the homeless and drug addicts in the community. Furthermore, I plan to work with Doctors Without Borders at least 1-2 months a year, showing others that one person can make a difference. No less importantly, I plan to challenge and campaign for universal dental care in Canada’s healthcare system.

I bring with me to the DDS program a solid academic foundation in Biology coupled with numerous volunteer experiences, observerships and direct-patient contact that has only solidified my certainty that I am exactly where I need to be.  From the time I was in elementary school in India, I have volunteered, giving of myself and my time to soup kitchens. Even when I was 12, in Vancouver I volunteered at the local seniors’ community center. Overall, my volunteer experiences in two highly diverse countries have increased my self-confidence, self-efficacy, interpersonal abilities, teamwork ability and cultural competency as well as bringing me into contact with people of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds.

 In order to prepare for the opportunity and challenge of a quality DDS program, I actively sought out and procured observerships with dentists, gaining an introduction to multiple procedures such as fillings, root canals, bridges and mold making. Interacting with dentists, I gained detailed insights into the challenges of dental school and dentistry.

Volunteering at Pediatric Dentist Dr. XXXX clinic these past two years, I have been fortunate to work as a chair-side dental assistant, giving me unprecedented access, insights and respect for the science and art of Dentistry. The greatest contribution has been exposure to Dr. XXXX’s volunteer work at a drug addiction shelter. One particular experience stands out in my mind: a young woman, 24-years old and a drug addict with rotten and missing teeth. I set her up for an initial check-up, my mind racing through drug addict portrayals in movies and TV; none fit, nor ever would again. We introduced ourselves, talking about one another's lives. Her drug addiction aside, she was just a normal person with a normal life and one of the sweetest people I ever met. Her initial checkup indicated all four wisdom teeth and two others needed extraction. She coaxed Dr. XXXX into extracting all six teeth in one sitting.  Everything was going well until the last wisdom tooth, which despite Novocain was causing her intense pain. As Dr. XXXX tried to extract the tooth, she began to weep. More Novocain was given, but the pain was too much and the tooth held fast. XXXX asked her if he should stop and she said something that changed my perception and motivation forever: “No, I know you are doing this for my own good and are trying to help me. Please ignore my tears; I will try not to cry". We were moved by her bravery and appreciation. Once the procedure was done, she hugged and thanked everyone for helping her. Her appreciation forever changed my focus from practice-based dentistry to pro bono dentistry.

 Through all of my experiences, I have learned that Dentistry is not only a career but an ideal, one that inspires helping all who need dental care, rich or poor.  I hope that by the time I take my last breath, dental care will be covered by universal healthcare and that the inspiration for change will spread to other nations with people in dire need of dental care.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

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I need assistance writing my SOP. I am a dentist from india applying for DDS program in USA. Thanks



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